Posts Tagged ‘la chureca’

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We’re Back!

August 8, 2010

I’m enjoying a leisurely evening at home with my siblings, recovering from the day of travel. The past two weeks were incredible. There’s so much to cover, and I’ll get to some of it later once I have photos to add. (With 1400+ transferring as I type, it will be a while.)

Wednesday, August 4th, I went to the dump for the third time during this trip and brought the books. We presented them to Maria; it was surreal. I’ve been seeing many of these books on a regular basis for months. They were piled in my room, stacked in my closet, and lugged back and forth from the church. To finally hand them over was an incredible encouragement. I got a chance to talk about what The Library Mission will be working on this next year and I’ll write a post about that soon.

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Recent Additions

July 7, 2010

There is this incredible place called SCARCE, and this is their mission:

“SCARCE is dedicated to educating students, teachers, residents, businesses, and the general public to conserve natural resources and energy, prevent pollution, reduce waste, recycle, and compost organic materials, so that together we can make a difference; we can protect the environment and work toward a sustainable future for our community.”

What does this mean for us? It means that because The Library Mission is supporting a school, I was able to get good secondhand Spanish school books–many of which are for native Spanish speakers. My sister went the first time (because she’s going to be teaching Middle Schoolers in the fall) and brought back these.

Here’s how they stack up next to my cat:

Yesterday I went for the first time. In addition to books I got two gallon bags of unbroken crayons and some flash cards. (The packaging is in English, but numbers are universal!)

I also got several “super crayons.” SCARCE makes these by melting down all the broken crayons they receive.

I think the kids will like them…

The kittens sure do!

And here’s a look at the 20-something books.

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Updates

July 7, 2010

I’ll be leaving for Nicaragua in 18 days–the 25th. Here a some things that have changed: I’m nixing the book laminate and instead going for the significantly cheaper rolls of clear packing tape. This can be used to repair and reinforce pages as well as bindings, and it can be used for a myriad of other things.
Though Marcia’s been looking for cabinets, we really haven’t been able to find what we were looking for in Nicaragua. At this point we are strongly considering giving Maria money to build/purchase something she considers suitable. Another option is large Rubbermaid bins like so:

Regarding the encyclopedia set we’ve run into a problem not knowing the age group. We have conflicting ranges of 3-6 and 4-10. There are some good sets, but they might not be of use to certain age groups. I’ll keep working on this, and we probably won’t get a set until after this trip. I’ll know a lot more of what the school’s like now and what it may be like later once I return. Also, the book evaluations haven’t gone as planned. I lost touch with the volunteers, and have decided to sort the books into “uncertain” and “okay” piles. Pretty much all the kids books should be fine, but the longer ones or those theological in nature I’ll mark in some way so Maria can get someone to go through them.

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More Than 200 Books

June 16, 2010

There were a bunch of books donated and now we have more than 200 books. This milestone is a particularly special one to me because LibraryThing, the site I use to keep track of all the books, only lets free members store up to that many. So, my sister donated the $25 dollars that was needed for us to have a lifetime membership adding as many books as we ever get. =]

Speaking of my sister, she was so kind as to write down the titles of the Spanish children encyclopedias that are owned by one of the local libraries. I figured that whatever they bought must be pretty good. Amazon only has two of the three she listed. Click the images to go to the corresponding Amazon/sellers page.

$399.00 - Published in 2001

$437.99 - Published in 2006

Apparently the first one has a relatively selective amount of entries and the second has a lot more, but they are briefer. The other one my sister wrote down, “Enciclopedia de los Pueblos del Mundo,”  is about different countries and their peoples.

About $42 depending on the site - Published in 2005

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Mission Trip Prep – More Details

April 20, 2010

I mentioned earlier how my youth group broke into groups to plan various aspects of our forthcoming trip. We had our second breakout session yesterday, and I have a bit more detailed outline of our Library Mission project. Bob and I threw around some numbers and came up with a current projection of $1,500 to cover costs. What will this money go towards?

  • $300.00 for book laminate (this number is almost exact because I know how much the stuff costs; it will cover the books we already have and leave laminate for later.)
  • $300.00 for approx 3 cabinets (this is an estimate because we have no solid source of obtainment)
  • $500.00 for a quality Spanish encyclopedia set (this is based on the prices I saw on Amazon, though we hope to purchase this in Nicaragua)
  • $100.00 for various reference materials (dictionary, thesaurus, atlas)
  • $30-40 for The Chronicles of Narnia (Again, Amazon.)

This is a little of $1,200. We rounded up because you never know what extra expenses may occur, and then if we fall a bit short we’ll presumably be okay. If we have extra it can be given to Maria to purchase more books later, or we could get them ourselves. How will this money be raised? Through fundraisers like car washes and cookouts, and anyone who wants to contribute. (Hint, hint.)

If you don’t have money, there are things other than books that would be great to have. Some ideas for donations are puzzles, Memory games, checkers, chess, art supplies, and items similar to those found here and here.

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Book Evaluations (Among Other Things)

April 19, 2010

There are a few people that have committed to helping me read and review all the books donated thus far, and I am grateful for them. I read one of the bilingual books myself (so short it hardly counts), but I plan on reading other longer ones.

I did a bit of comparing and I think I found the best deal on book laminate (book protection). Woohoo! Now I need to decide whether or not it’s worth it to get book tape as well. First, how much better is book tape than regular tape? And will the entire book last long enough to make the extra expense worthwhile? I’m leaning towards forgoing book tape and instead looking for Spanish reference materials–something Maria professed a need for. Ideally, I would like to purchase them in Nicaragua. Then we don’t have to ship them, it’s putting money in the economy, and I’d know it’s the type of encyclopedia/dictionary/thesaurus/etc. that they would be useful and of interest to them.

Today I stumbled across a very interesting site while comparing prices: Learning Resources. I’m not planning on getting anything there now, but it gives me lots of ideas. What I like is that the site has learning games made with native Spanish speakers in mind, rather than for those learning it as a second language. I wish I knew more of what kind of school materials are available in Nicaragua and their cost.

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Global Missions Team

March 11, 2010

On Tuesday I was privileged to drop in on Ginger Creek’s Global Missions Team meeting and tell them a bit about the Library Mission. There were a couple familiar faces and a couple new ones, but, regardless of our acquaintance, they were all friendly and encouraging. And it was neat experience to see Marcia on the webcam.

Although I can be fairly eloquent in writing, my words got jumbled together a couple of times. Still, they hung with me as I told them about how the Library Mission got started and what I envisioned for the future. It was wonderful to have their knowledge and experience available to draw upon. What can I say–I like talking with adults.

I believe I mentioned Tipitapa in a previous post. I wanted to bring it up again, because it’s a name you’ll be hearing increasingly alongside Pochocuape and La Chureca. People that used to be in La Chureca are now living there, and I intend to include them in the Library Mission later on. Right now I have no specifics, but I thought I would let you know all the same.

I’ll leave you with a link to a slideshow.